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Guido Mocafico’s Blaschka glass biological model photographs

Generations before 3D printing was available to museums and institutions of higher learning, father and son glass-makers Leopold and Rudolf Blaschka were working tirelessly to produce thousands of glass models of invertebrate animals and plants. With clients as illustrious as Harvard University, Cornell University, and the Natural History Museum of London and Dublin, the Blaschka’s put tremendous emphasis on conveying, through glass, as much detail and accuracy as possible.

LEOPOLD & RUDOLF BLASCHKA LYMNOREA TRIEDA (BL016) ©2013 Chromogenic print 70×52,6 cm Edition of 8+2 AP With kind permission of the Natural History Museum, Dublin

The models they produced from the mid-1800s until the 1930s were not intended for public sale. They were highly-specialized 3D models used by researchers to aid in species identification and study at time in which almost all such information was stored as text and drawings.

Due to their rare and fragile nature, the institutions who acquired these magnificent models have considerable restrictions in place in order to protect and preserve them and access is extremely limited.

Despite those barriers to access, photographer Guido Mocafico was able to spend the last several years carefully photographing exemplars of the Blaschka glass models. The photographs from those three years of work went display in an exhibition at Hamilton’s Gallery (London) on March 18, 2016.

In describing his project, Mocafico states,

What I thought would be one years work… has become an obsession, which is the attitude the Blaschka’s had in their work. We must not forget they spent 30-50 years each of their lifetimes, day and night, creating glass models. So for them the commitment was just unbelievable. I am not scared to face that kind of long term job because it is like a homage to the Blaschka’s.”

Though they are obsolete with regards to their utility as a scientific aids, the approximately 4,400 surviving Blaschka biological models maintain an enduring value as glasswork masterpieces and as magnificent products of the ‘golden age’ of natural history.

LEOPOLD & RUDOLF BLASCHKA SPONGOSPHAERA STREPTACANTHA (BL030) ©2013 Chromogenic print70x52,6 cm Edition of 8+2 AP With kind permissionof the Natural HistoryMuseum, Dublin
LEOPOLD & RUDOLF BLASCHKA COMATULA MEDITERRANEA (BL033) ©2013 Chromogenic print70x52,6 cm Edition of 8+2 AP With kind permissionof the Natural HistoryMuseum, Dublin
LEOPOLD & RUDOLF BLASCHKA OPHIOTHRIX SERRATA (BL035) ©2013 Chromogenic print70x52,6 cm Edition of 8+2 AP With kind permissionof the Natural HistoryMuseum, Dublin
LEOPOLD & RUDOLF BLASCHKA BECCARIA TRICOLOR (BL043) ©2013 Chromogenic print70x52,6 cm Edition of 8+2 AP With kind permissionof the Natural HistoryMuseum, Dublin
LEOPOLD & RUDOLF BLASCHKA TEREBELLA EMMALINA (BL046) ©2013 Chromogenic print70x52,6 cm Edition of 8+2 AP With kind permissionof the Natural HistoryMuseum, Dublin
LEOPOLD & RUDOLF BLASCHKA ENOPLOTEUTHIS VERANII (BL167) ©2013 Chromogenic print70x52,6 cm Edition of 8+2 AP With kind permissionof the Natural HistoryMuseum, Dublin
LEOPOLD & RUDOLF BLASCHKA APOLEMIA UVARIA (BL185)©2013 Chromogenic print70x52,6 cm Edition of 8+2 AP With kind permissionof the Natural HistoryMuseum, Geneva
LEOPOLD & RUDOLF BLASCHK ATURRIS DIGITALE (BL195)©2013 Chromogenic print70x52,6 cm Edition of 8+2 AP With kind permissionof the Natural HistoryMuseum, Geneva
LEOPOLD & RUDOLF BLASCHKA CHRYSAORA HYSOSCELLA (BL179) ©2013 Chromogenic print 70×52,6 cm Edition of 8+2 AP With kind permission of the Natural History Museum, Geneva
LEOPOLD & RUDOLF BLASCHKA GLAUCUS LONGICIRRUS (BL078) ©2013 Chromogenic print70x52,6 cm Edition of 8+2 AP With kind permissionof the Natural HistoryMuseum, Dublin
LEOPOLD & RUDOLF BLASCHKA PHYSALIA PELAGICA (BL054) ©2013 Chromogenic print70x52,6 cm Edition of 8+2 AP With kind permissionof the Natural HistoryMuseum, Dublin

 

 

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